Grand Junction Mayor Rick Taggart recently addressed the state of the city of Grand Junction saying it's "on the right track." Do you agree?

There is no question Grand Junction has suffered the effects of economic downturn for a number of years. Yet, it seems that the city has managed to keep its head above water, and maybe the mayor is right, we're on the right track.

One of the problems, as is the case with any form of government, is the differences of opinion on how things should go and what is best for the people being governed. What's the best direction to take to achieve our goals and to find success and prosperity. Whether it's city, state, or federal government, we just can't seem to agree

Case in point would be last year's failed bid to gain voter approval on a 5,000-seat events center in downtown Grand Junction. City leaders felt this would solve a lot of Grand Junction's problems, while voters clearly had a different view.

In the video, Grand Junction City Manager Greg Caton mentions the developments at Las Colonias Park, and that certainly looks like it could be a real asset to the community. That seems to be a step in the right direction.

Despite tough times in recent years, the city and county have been able to make tremendous improvements to Grand Junction's infrastructure including Highway 6 & 50 from Walmart to Mesa Mall, the 29 Road Bridge, the Riverside Parkway, and improvements to downtown and to North Avenue.

There are plenty of other positive things about the Grand Junction community. We still have the mall, a couple of nice movie theaters, Canyon View Park along with numerous other city parks, a great baseball field and football stadium, a university, access to medical care, a great view of the Grand Mesa and the Bookcliffs, public golf courses, hiking and biking trails, and the list goes on.

Sure, like any community we have problems.  Good-paying jobs are scarce, housing is barely affordable, we have schools that are in disrepair,  and a number of businesses continue to struggle to keep their doors open.

I don't have the answers. That's why I'm not in politics or city government.  I know there are no easy answers, and there is no perfect path toward economic and social vibrancy and vitality. It feels like things are tough everywhere.

The question is, do you agree with the mayor that Grand Junction is on the right track?