Winter weather is in the forecast, but despite that, it seems like the weather is getting warmer up here in Northern Colorado. 

To be a Colorado resident is to partake in all the beautiful experiences our lovely state has to offer-- one of those being hot springs!

There's a lot of things to remember about hot springs.  First of all, Colorado has a lot-- Colorado.com recently profiled 27 of their favorites.  Secondly, hot springs have been known to have healing powers because of the minerals that are in the water.  Third-- and most importantly-- some are...uh...clothing optional. 

Here are six hot springs you may be missing out on-- with our big winter storm on the way, you may still have time to sit, relax, and enjoy the snowy mountains while steaming away.

 

  • 1

    Iron Mountain Hot Springs

    This retreat is in Glenwood Springs near the Colorado River.  Something to consider-- this is ranked on TripAdvisor.com as the #1 spa in the area.

  • 2

    Penny Hot Springs

    Penny Hot Springs is in Carbondale, Colorado.  According to Penny Hot Springs' website, in the 1960s, nearby residents attempted to destroy the park because of the nudity that it was known for-- however, in the '90s the pools were rebuilt and opened to the public.

  • 3

    Ouray Hot Springs

    The Ouray Hot Springs pool almost seems like a water park with slides, lanes for lap swimmers, and more.  However with the gorgeous 360 degree views of the mountains and the naturally heated water, this is unlike any water park you've ever seen.

  • 4

    Strawberry Park Hot Springs

    The Strawberry Park Hot Springs are well reviewed on TripAdvisor.com, so if you're heading down to Steamboat Springs anytime soon this may be a great way to relax and unwind.  Check out the 'old-timey' decor while you're there!

  • 5

    Pagosa Hot Springs

    If this mysterious picture doesn't make you want to go take a soak, I don't know what will. Pagosa Hot Springs is known for its supposed 'healing powers'-- on their website, they note that a U.S. army doctor brought wounded soldiers to the springs in the 1890s for research.